Awaken Nepal

Eid Mubarak- festival of sacrifice

Eid al-Adha or “Festival of the Sacrifice” is also called the “Sacrifice Feast”, is the second of two Muslim holidays celebrated worldwide each year. In Nepal also, muslim are celebrating this festival with lots of enthusiasm and fun.

It honors the willingness of Ibrahim (Abraham) to sacrifice his son, as an act of submission to God’s command, before God then intervened sending his angel Jibra’il (Gabriel) to inform him that his sacrifice had already been accepted. The meat from the sacrificed animal is divided into three parts. The family retains one third of the share; another third is given to relatives, friends and neighbors; and the remaining third is given to the poor and needy.




Eid al-Adha is the latter of the two Eid holidays, the former being Eid al-Fitr. The word “Eid” appears once in Al-Ma’ida, the fifth sura of the Quran, with the meaning “solemn festival”.

Like Eid al-Fitr, Eid al-Adha begins with a sunnah prayer of two rakats followed by a sermon (khutbah). Eid al-Adha celebrations start after the descent of the Hujjaj, the pilgrims performing the Hajj, from Mount Arafat , a hill east of Mecca. Eid sacrifice may take place until sunset on the 13th day of Dhu al-Hijjah. The days of Eid have been singled out in the Hadith as “days of remembrance” and considered the holiest days in the Islamic Calendar. The takbir (days) of Tashriq are from the Maghrib prayer of the 29th of Dhul-Qadah up to the Maghrib prayer of the 13th of Dhu al-Hijjah (thirteen days and nights).

In Kathmandu, Muslims gathered at Jamia and Kashmiri, two of the biggest shrines in Ghantaghar.

Muslim families celebrate this festival by inviting their relative and serving delicious dishes like sewaii(sweet pudding) and grilled kebabs and exchange the greetings of Eid Mubarak.